Fuck Yeah Stephen Sondheim

Bow before the fucking king of musical theater.

You can put stuff in my ask box, but I'm unlikely to answer on the blog. I will probably just put the answer in your ask box. If you really want to have a conversation, I'm always on Twitter.

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suttonmientus:

Stephen Sondheim’s Career In Playbill’s

232 plays
Stephen Sondheim,
Sondheim Sings, Vol. III (unofficial)

This song was from Sondheim’s early attempt at telling the Mizner Brothers’ story, long before the version that would be Wise Guys / Gold! / Bounce / Road Show.

gdelgiproducer:

fuckyeahstephensondheim:

What is really interesting about this report is that this is a different musical collaboration with David Ives than had been previously reported. In 2012, Sondheim announced he and Ives were working on All Together Now, a new musical based on a small moment from Ives’s All in the Timing that would progress backwards a la Merrily We Roll Along.

If you’re curious about the sources for this newly announced project, you can rent The Discrete Charm of the Bourgeoisie from YouTube’s Video on Demand service. The Exterminating Angel is part of The Criterion Collection, so Hulu+ members can stream it free from that service.

It’s interesting to note that Silvia Pinal, who played Rose in the Mexican production of Gypsy, starred in The Exterminating Angel

What’s even more interesting, and often goes unremarked, is that this collaboration with Ives was Sondheim’s second attempt at All Together Now. The first, in 1991, had a book by Terrence McNally (Kiss of the Spider Woman and Ragtime, among others). As McNally put it: “Steve was interested in telling the story of a relationship from the present back to the moment when the couple first met. We worked together a while, but we were both involved with so many other projects that this one fell through.”

It gets better. A full script, with concept notes by Sondheim and McNally, is archived in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. The story in that version follows Arden Scott, a 30-something female sculptor, and Daniel Nevin, a slightly younger, sexually charismatic restaurateur.

You can find more details in Raymond-Jean Frontain’s 2011 article “Mutual admiration,” from Vol. 17 of the Sondheim Review.

Guess there’s something to be said for abandoning a project twice and realizing that maybe it just doesn’t want to get made? The descriptions everyone gave it, which didn’t much vary from the McNally to the Ives version, sounded like too little, too late (albeit less personal, obviously) when compared to The Last Five Years.

I didn’t remember the McNally version (although now that you point it out, I vaguely remember that they were collaborating one something that never came to pass). Thanks for fleshing out the details.

What is really interesting about this report is that this is a different musical collaboration with David Ives than had been previously reported. In 2012, Sondheim announced he and Ives were working on All Together Now, a new musical based on a small moment from Ives’s All in the Timing that would progress backwards a la Merrily We Roll Along.

If you’re curious about the sources for this newly announced project, you can rent The Discrete Charm of the Bourgeoisie from YouTube’s Video on Demand service. The Exterminating Angel is part of The Criterion Collection, so Hulu+ members can stream it free from that service.

It’s interesting to note that Silvia Pinal, who played Rose in the Mexican production of Gypsy, starred in The Exterminating Angel

I know I make fun of Playbill on occasion a lot, but I’m still tickled that they linked to a video from our THREE WISHES FOR SONDHEIMAS show on their Facebook page today!

I know I make fun of Playbill on occasion a lot, but I’m still tickled that they linked to a video from our THREE WISHES FOR SONDHEIMAS show on their Facebook page today!

joespub:

Betty Buckley makes her Joe’s Pub debut tonight—the first of night of seven shows with a five piece band playing the music from her new album Ghostlight. The recording released on Sept 16 reunites her with longtime friend and producer T. Bone Burnett.  When Buckley and Burnett were both 19 years old, living in Fort Worth, TX, they began making music together. Buckley, who has been called “The Voice of Broadway,” is one of theater’s most respected and legendary leading ladies. Burnett’s highly sought after involvement in music, film, TV and stage projects is marked by his uncanny ability to successfully combine his unique artistic sensibilities with massive commercial appeal. These two friends and talents created an atmosphere that takes us to another time and place. 

Seeing Betty Buckley in an intimate club setting is an entirely different experience from seeing her on a Broadway-sized stage. I highly recommend it if you get the chance.

Chicago’s Improvised Sondheim Project is in New York this weekend for the Sixth Annual New York Musical Improv Festival.

These are two things about which I know nothing and I blame all of my followers from Chicago and the world of improv for that.

Have you seen them before? Are they any good? 

This is exciting news, but read it carefully - we’re not going to see this book for at least four years…

512 plays
Lea DeLaria,
Play It Cool

While we’re all in a Sweeney Todd mood…

(from Lea’s excellent album Play It Cool.)

PBS already has the new lincolncenter nyphil Sweeney Todd available as streaming video on their website.